Popular among early settlers in Florida, the classic “dog trot” was a modest home with a plan containing two living spaces separated by an open breezeway. The breezeway was used to circulate air around the living spaces to alleviate Florida’s humid climate and could later be closed in as a family grew. In this modern interpretation of the dog trot, the public living space and private sleeping spaces are linked by a vertical foyer, which acts as the traditional breezeway by allowing cool breezes in the lower windows and flushing warm air out of the upper windows.

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This river view home was designed for a retired couple with a fondness for the architecture of Tuscan Italy. Since most traditional Tuscan architecture is not well-suited for the Florida climate, the expression of materials often seen in Northern Italy informed this home. Genuine stone cladding, stone walkways, and exposed wood structural elements allow the building to remind the clients of their favorite travel destination while the home’s overall massing and orientation remains genuine to their East Central Florida site.

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Situated on the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, this home was designed to recall the vernacular cottage architecture of the Southeastern United States favored by its owners. Covered porches, a balcony, strategically-placed windows, and an efficient floor plan provide for outdoor views from nearly every room in the house. Traditional materials and architectural details are used in a contemporary manner to give this cottage casual sophistication.

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The owners of a one-story concrete block home typical of many homes built in Florida during the 1950’s and 1960’s, wanted two additional bedrooms and a bathroom while keeping largely within their existing building footprint. To accommodate the owner’s program, the majority of the new square footage was located as a new second floor with only a small new space being added to the existing first floor. However, this new space introduced spatial volume formerly lacking in the home while simultaneously accommodating a new stairway and providing a welcoming entry area.

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A new owner of a small non-descript 1950’s home in Orlando wanted to explore options for altering the exterior of the building without adding new square footage. The result was a series of concepts exploring different uses of roof form, exposed wood structural elements and wood cladding, all program requirements of the owner. This study provided the owner with a range of ideas and alternatives for a future renovation with varying degrees of interventions and costs.

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This design concept created a pedestrian-scaled urban environment for a four and ½ block mixed-use corridor in New Smyrna Beach, FL. Condensing the existing vehicular travel lanes allowed for the creation of wide sidewalks, public seating areas, on-street parallel parking, and street furnishings all designed to enhance the pedestrian experience and to promote interaction with existing and future buildings. Each intersection contains pavement treatments, hardscape, and landscape features that accentuate pedestrian crossings and impart a unique context to this distinct area. The overall concept for the corridor is seamlessly linked together through the consistent use of color, pattern, lighting, street trees, and public seating designed with local coquina stone.

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